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MHP 2005 Traffic Safety Compendium

267 people died in crashes involving a teen driver in Missouri - 19,616 injured

Total fatalities - 2005 - 1,257  people in 1,117 crashes / 2004 - 1,130 people in 1,006 crashes / 2003 - 1,232 people in 1,095 crashes

In 2005, a driver invoved in a crash in Missouri who was not wearing a seatbelt, had a 1 in 32 chance of being killed. With a seatbelt, the odds lowered to 1 in 1,017.

In 2005 1,117 fatal crashes, 72.7% were rural, 27.4% urban.
35.3% on curve, 64.7% on straight road.
43.6% on level, 53.5% on hill, 3% on crest.
86.2% dry pavement, 12.6% wet, 1.3% snow, ice or slush.
53.8% daylight, 11.8% dark but streetlights on, 33.2% dark and no streetlights.
22.3% state numbered highway, 17.7 US Highway, 16% Interstate, 13.8% city street, 12.1% single state lettered, 10.6% county road, 5.6% double state lettered

Of all fatal crashes, 21.1% involved a teen driver (under age of 21).

Vehicles involved in fatal crashes - 43.2% automobiles, 19.8% pick-up, 12.8% SUV, 6% van, 5% motorcycle,


2004/2005 figures MODOT MO Highway System (2005 in red)

Source - 2004 and 2005 Missouri State Highway System Traffic Accident Statistics
only covers crashes on State Highway system

Urban - population 5M - 49,999 / Urbanized 50M - 199,999 / Metro -  200M+ (grouped with urbanized)
91,201 total accidents / 36,131 rural (39.6%) / 10,151 urban  (11.1%) / 44,919 urbanized  (49.3%)
77% fatal rural / 5% fatal urban / 18% urbanized
90,419 total accidents / 35,093 rural  (38.8%) / 8,844 urban  (9.8%) / 46,482 urbanized (51.4%)
76.7% fatal rural / 3.5% fatal urban / 19.8% fatal urbanized

404 on road fatal accidents = 71% another vehicle, 10% pedestrian, 6% overturned, 13% other
535 on road fatal accidents = 70% another vehicle, 10% pedestrian, 5% overturned, 15% other

370 off road fatal accidents = 83% fixed object, 12% overturned, 4% other
438 off road fatal accidents = 75% fixed object, 18% overturned, 7% other

Totals = 69,915 on road accidents - 21,286 off road accidents
Totals = 69,865 on road accidents - 20,666 off road accidents

774 fatal accidents - 77% rural, 18% urbanized, 5% urban
852 fatal accidents - 77% rural, 20% urbanized, 3% urban

In 2004, 0.85% of all accidents on Missouri highways ended in fatality, 28.28% ended in injury.
In 2005, 0.94% of all accidents on Missouri highways ended in fatality, 28.34% ended in injury

Of 774, 233 were on MO numbered routes, 190 on MO lettered route, 182 US numbered routes, 141 on Interstates, and 28 on others.
Of 852, 245 were on MO numbered routes, 206 on MO lettered route, 200 US numbered routes, 180 on Interstates, and 21 on others

MODOT figures - 6.76% of MO drivers are aged 16-20, 14.48% of state accidents involved drivers 16-20
MODOT figures - 6.94% of MO drivers are aged 16-20, 14.35% of state accidents involved drivers 16-20 in 2005

Teen drivers - 13.2% of fatal crashes / 15.78% in injury crashes / in MO 21-25 age group had 11 more fatal crashes than 16-20 but 15-20 age group had 1,200 more injury crashes and 2,000 more total crashes than the 21-25 age group. Other age groups were less.
Teen drivers - 11.1% of fatal crashes / 15.25% in injury crashes / in MO 21-25 age group had 36 more fatal crashes than 16-20 but 16-20 age group had 835 more injury crashes and 2,217 more total crashes than the than the 21-25 age group.

Fixed objects fatal - 473 total - 128 embankment, 79 tree, 44 fence, 37 sign post, 36 ditch, 34 guardrail, 25 culverts, 15 utility pole, 11 curb, 10 mailbox, balance - others
Fixed objects fatal - 456 total - 135 embankment, 73 tree, 35 fence, 36 sign post, 38 ditch, 27 guardrail, 25 culverts, 17 utility pole, 8 curb, 13 mailbox, balance - others

Of 91,201 accidents in 2004, 19% were investigated by MHP, and balance by local agencies.Of 744 fatal accidents, 81.1% were investigated by MHP.
Of 90,420 accidents in 2005, 35% were investigated by MHP, and balance by local agencies. Of 852 fatal accidents, 81.8% were investigated by MHP

The 2004 Missouri Traffic Safety Compendium -249 young drivers killed and 20,464 related injuries. That means every 25.4 minutes, a teen driver was killed or injured.

Of 774 fatal crashes, 444 were in clear skies, 248 were in cloudy conditions, 54 rain, 16 snow, 5 fog/mist, 2 freezing rain, 1 sleet, and 4 unknown
Of 852 fatal crashes, 516 were in clear skies, 275 were in cloudy conditions, 38 rain, 8 snow, 8 fog/mist, 4 freezing rain, and 3 unknown

2004 - total of 877 fatalities
2005 - total of 973 fatalities


Teen Statistics (15-20 years old)

Motor Vehicle Crashes are the leading cause of deaths among teens in the United States.
5,240 teens were killed in crashes in 2003, and 458,000 teens were injured.
One teen will die every hour during the weekend, and one every two hours during the week (on average)
From 1994 to 2004, crash rates for teen drivers increased 5%. Crashes involving teen males increased by 1%, while those involving teen females increased 15%.
Source NHTSA Teens at Risk Report

This year over 83,000 Missouri teens will turn 16 years of age.
Source US Census


....Meanwhile, car accidents are the top killer of teens.

Nearly 6,000 teens were killed and 303,000 hurt in auto crashes in 2004. Teens make up 6 percent of all licensed drivers, but they are involved in 14 percent of deadly crashes.

"There is no national outrage about this," said Mark Rosenker, acting chairman of the safety board. "The outrage only comes when there are huge accidents. But we are trying to do something about it. I really believe education is where we can make the greatest impact."....

Associated Press - 8/19/2006 from Time for a driver's education overhaul? by Ben Feller


Missouri does not issue driver licenses to applicants who are less than 16 years old (permits only). As of May 31, 2006, our records indicate that 297,878 Missourians age 16-20 held unexpired driver licenses. dorx.mo.gov/publicreports/

Greene County - 15,371 licensed drivers age 15-20 (8%) - total all ages - 193,105
Christian County - 4,803 15-20 (9.5%) - total all ages - 50,308
Jasper County - 7,543 15-20 (9%) - total all ages - 82,967

Based on MHP figures, the most dangerous time for a fatal accident is on Friday in May between 2pm and 5 pm.  

In 2004, the ratio of passenger vehicles in fatal accidents to all accidents was 1 in 138.09 vehicles. For motorcycles, the ratio was 1 in 28.13.  


* Large 4-door passenger cars had the lowest fatal crash rates followed closely by minivans. The highest fatal crash rate was observed in small 4-door cars, mid-sized SUVs and compact pickup trucks.

Two factors accounted for the difference in fatal crash rates between large passenger cars (average weight 3,596 lbs.) and mid-sized SUVs (average weight 4,022 lbs.). Mid-sized SUVs were nine times as likely to involve a rollover fatality and twice as likely to cause a fatality in occupants of other vehicles. In non-rollover crashes, the fatality rate for the occupants of SUVs and passenger cars of similar weight was essentially equal.

from NHTSA report


2005 official statistics - US (Missouri ranks 7th worst in teen driving fatalities behind CA, TX, FL, GA, NC, PA)

2005 Overall Fatality Statistics - all ages - (Missouri fatality rate 21.7 per 100M population, while national average is 14.7)

Ten Leading Causes of Death by age group


In the U.S. during 2004, 4,767 teens ages 16 to 19 died of injuries caused by motor vehicle crashes. During 2005, nearly 400,000 motor vehicle occupants in this age group sustained nonfatal injuries severe enough to require treatment in an emergency department (CDC 2006). source


The risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among 16- to 19-year-olds than among any other age group. In fact, per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are four times more likely than older drivers to crash (IIHS 2006). source source


In 2005 38% of all fatal crashes involved male drivers ages 15 to 20 who were speeding.  source - NHTSA


In 2004, the motor vehicle death rate for male drivers and passengers age 16 to 19 was more than one and a half times that of their female counterparts (19.4 per 100,000 compared with 11.1 per 100,000) (CDC 2006).


The reasons for not using a proven safety measure like a seat belt are unclear. Adolescent development may play a role in this risky driving behavior. Reasons for non-use commonly cited by teens in our series of focus groups were: the belts are uncomfortable; the trip was short; forgetfulness; lack of understanding about the importance of seat belts in a crash; and seat belts are not "cool. source